The Marvellous Hearts

“This is like a sonic time machine that can take you way back to a simpler time, filled with awe and wonder.” Nkechi Anele, Roots ‘N’ All, Triple J

“The Marvellous Hearts sound like what happens when you give crate-digging music fanatics instruments and tell them to go make a record. There’s snippets of every record they’ve ever heard swirling around in their sound. One minute you hear The Beatles, then it’s Bob Dylan on rotation. Hell, then I hear a fragment that reminds me of one particular Paul Kelly song, and another faint echo that had me thinking Goanna. And yet out of this melting pot comes something distinct and un-pigeonholeable. And did I mention that they ooze attitude? I like them. Chances are you will too.” Stuart Coupe

When Captain Bluetongue of Sydney duo the Blues Preachersembarked on his new project it was a case of following his heart. The seasoned musician, who has performed at festivals all over Australia, including Byron Bay Bluesfest, the Woodford Folk Festival, the Blue Mountains Music Festival and the Gympie Muster, wrote a bunch of songs that felt like they needed a new home and so the Marvellous Hearts were born.

Now his ragtag crew includes George Rigatos on lead guitar, Hutchon drums, Danny Tsun on keys, and Katherine Vavahea on backing vocals, all established musicians in their own right. Their music is grounded in old school blues and traditional folk with flourishes of rock and reggae, with songs which are too relevant today to be labelled as “retro revivalists”. And it’s a line-up that feels meant to be. In fact, George was supposed to be part of the original Hearts line-up but couldn’t due to heart surgery. But a successful operation and a few twists of fate meant he was back on board after all.

If the Blues Preachers evoked classic blues of the 1930s and ’40s, then the Marvellous Hearts take their starting point from the ’60s and ’70s. They’ve been compared to the Beatles and Bob Dylan by none other than music icon Stuart Coupe, with their tracks being spun on 2ser. They’ve also had comparisons drawn to Tom Petty and the Black Sorrows and been played across the country on community radio and the ABC.